Tag Archives: two

Charles Apple: Two Recent Infographic Fails You Ought to Know About

Readers:

Charles AppleI have been a big fan of Charles Apple’s work for a long time. I have blogged about him and his work in the past (see “Charles Apple” in my Categories on the right or do a search for “Charles Apple” on my blog).

Charles Apple (photo, right) is a longtime news artist, graphics reporter, designer, editor and blogger. The former graphics director of the Virginian-Pilot and the Des Moines Register, he spent five years as an international consultant and instructor. Currently, he’s Focus page editor of the Orange County Register.

I always like to reshare articles and blogs about what NOT to do in regards to data visualization and infographics. This morning, Mr. Apple posted a blog entry titled “Two recent infographic fails you ought to know about.” Charles has always shown a keen eye for detail and accuracy. He is also very reflective of his own work as today’s blog entry shows.

I hope you enjoy Mr. Apple’s thoughts as much as I do.

Have a great Good Friday and Happy Easter.

Best Regards,

Michael

Source: Charles Apple, Two recent infographic fails you ought to know about, http://www.charlesapple.com, April 18, 2014, http://www.charlesapple.com/2014/04/two-recent-infographic-fails-you-ought-to-know-about/.

Two recent infographic fails you ought to know about

A couple of charting debacles popped up this week of which you might want to take note.

POSITIVE VS. NEGATIVE SPACE

First, Reuters moved this fever chart showing the number of gun deaths in Florida going up after the state enacted its “stand your ground” law in 2005.

Just one little problem: The artist — for some unknown reason — elected to build the chart upside down from the usual way a fever chart is drawn.1404GunDeaths01Meaning the chart appears to show the number of gun deaths going down… if you focus on the white territory and consider the red to be the background of the chart.

After a lively discussion on a number of forums — most notably at Business Insider — a reader volunteered to flip the chart right-side around for clarity’s sake.1404GunDeaths02Is that better? Most folks seem to think it is.1404GunDeaths03Three important rules about infographics that I’m making up right here:

Rule 1: A graphic must be clear. If it’s not clear, then it’s not doing its job and should probably be put out of its misery.

Rule 2: It’s OK for a graphic to offer the reader a longer, more complicated view that requires more time spent observing a piece. But that’s not typically the job of a freakin’ one-column graphic.

Rule 3: Occasionally, it’s OK to flip a graphic upside down. But you’d better have a damned good reason for doing it. Other than, y’know, “I thought it’d look cool.”

This graphic fails all three: It’s not immediately clear — at least to many readers — and it’s a small graphic. So it has no business getting fancy. If the artist had a reason for turning it upside down, that reason eludes me.

Read more about the debate over this piece at…

UPSIDE DOWN YOU’RE TURNING ME

Full disclosure: I feel a little guilty criticizing this piece because I myself did something funky last week: I turned a map upside down:Unnamed_CCI_EPS

That ran in the middle of a page about John Steinbeck‘s the Grapes of Wrath. The intent was to show the route the fictional Joad family took in the book from the dust bowl of Oklahoma to what they hoped would be a better life here in Southern California.But vI really wanted to get those two pictures in there, which needed to read from left to right. I wanted those to sit atop my map showing the journey. I tried mapping it the usual way, but it was difficult to get the reader to stop — and then read this one segment of my page from right to left — and then resume reading the rest of the page from left to right.This would take quite a bit more vertical space and some very careful use of labels. And I was plum out of vertical space.So I elected to flop the map upside down. My logic: This time, it was more important to follow the narrative — to feel the twists and turns in the Joads’ journey — than to take in the geographical details of the trip. If the upside-down map was vetoed, Plan B would have been to kill the map and run the list of cities in a timeline-like format. There was just one problem with that: I already had a timeline on the page, just above the map:

Unnamed_CCI_EPS

We debated this and decided I was right to flip the map — This time. I can’t imagine too many times we’d ever want to run a map with the north arrow pointing down.And, y’know, perhaps we did the wrong thing. Another editor might have made a different choice.But the point is: We made a conscious decision here to let the map support the narrative. I don’t know what point Reuters was making with its upside-down fever chart. Whatever it was, it’s not apparent to me.It’s OK to make unusual choices. Just make sure your data is clear, your story is clear and readers don’t walk way from your piece puzzled as hell.

WHEN IS A MAP NOT A MAP?

This seems like a good time to present the other infographics debacle this week: This one is by NBC News.1404DemographicsOh, dear. I was just talking about using a map when the map wasn’t the most important element.What we have here is another fever chart, but this one has been pasted inside a map of the U.S. This has a number of effects that harm the greater good we do by presenting the data in the first place:Fever charts (and pie charts and bar charts and most other charts, for that matter) are all about showing proportions. If the proportions get screwed up — by, say, varying the widths of your bars or by covering up part of the chart — then the reader can’t make the visual comparisons you’re asking her to make.And that’s the case here: We see territory marked as “Asian” in the upper left of the chart and also at the upper right. But where is that set of data in 2010? I’m guessing it’s there, but it’s hidden outside the area of the map.

Rule 4: If you’re going to hide important parts of your chart, then your chart is no good. And, yes, it should be put out of its misery.

The data is displayed over a map. What is the artist trying to tell us? Where white people live in the U.S.? That Hispanics only live near Canada and Asians in Washington State and New England?No, the map is merely a decorative element. It has nothing at all to do with the data.

Rule 5: If you don’t need an element to tell your story, then eliminate it. Or I will.

Rule 6: If your decorative element gets in the way of your story, then not only do I demand you eliminate it, I also insist you come over here so I can smack you upside your head.

Rule 7: Don’t use a map if you’re not telling a story that includes some type of data that needs geographical context.

Oh, and don’t forget this last one:

Rule 8: Don’t tilt a map or turn it upside down. Not unless you have a good reason.

Go here to read more about the perils of rotating maps.

Welcome – Part 2

MichaelWelcome to my MicroStrategy Tips & Tricks blog. I have been kicking around the idea of creating a MicroStrategy-specific blog for a few years now. With Bryan Brandow not being as prolific these days with his excellent MicroStrategy blog, http://www.bryanbrandow.com, I thought I would make an attempt to try to fill that void (personally, I think Bryan is not replaceable).

I will try to focus mostly on providing interesting and useful tips and tricks related to the entire MicroStrategy platform. That is soup to nuts or Intelligence Server to Mobile, so to speak.

Right now, my main areas of main interest are in developing interactive, dynamic reports for Web and Mobile (most notably iPad). I have a strong passion for data visualization and have a sister site you can visit at http://www.datavizblog.com.

My company is called Data Archaeology, but I am not currently actively seeing business or employment. I am working a fairly long-term contract in retail and hope I will be able to continue to do so as time progresses.

I have decided not to allow sponsorship of my site so I can be objective about MicroStrategy as well as all the third-party vendors who provide goods and services related to MicroStrategy. You will not see me beating up on the MicroStrategy platform or any of its executive leadership (well, maybe some scolding). I have met Michael Saylor, Founder and CEO of MicroStrategy, many times over the years and I agree with him sometimes and sometimes I don’t. But it is his company and vision and I need to respect that. Michael is very focused on Mobile and Security right now, but I will gently remind him here that a lot of us are still doing enterprise reporting with MicroStrategy and to not take his eye of that ball too.

I have met Paul Zolfaghari,  President of MicroStrategy, several times and think he is perfect for that position. Paul is affable, accessible, and truly wants his customers to be happy.

I am a Principal MicroStrategy Consultant with Data Archaeology (consider this blog and my data visualization blog my Web Data Archaeology, Inc.site). My mantra that I  preach to everyone (or anyone who will listen) is to get our business partners or clients excited about their data. Now the way to do that could come in many different forms: great data visualization, self-service BI, data on multiple devices, properly organized data that is easy to access, ask questions, and provide actionable insights.

If you want to contact me directly, please drop me an e-mail at michael@dataarchaeology.net.

For you folks who will be at MicroStrategy World this week, I will be there Wednesday and Thursday. See if you can match my avatar to my face and stop me and say “Hi!”

Thanks for visiting and I hope to see you often.

Best regards,

Michael