Tag Archives: is

Infographic: The World’s Biggest Data Breaches (Information is Beautiful)

Readers:

Happy New Year!

In late November, presumed North Korean hackers targeted Sony Pictures Entertainment in an unprecedented cyber attack. This resulted in the exposure of thousands of sensitive emails from Sony executives and threats to release more if the release of the film “The Interview” wasn’t canceled.

While this breach was indeed historically devastating, it’s not the first successful cyber attack on a big corporate powerhouse.

David McCandless and the folks over at Information Is Beautiful have put together an amazing infographic with the biggest data breaches in recent history. You can see when the attack happened, who it happened to, and how large the impact was.

I always encourage my social media friends to reset all of your passwords each new year. Now is the time to do so.

Safe blogging.

Michael

[Click on image to use the interactive version]

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Information is Beautiful Awards 2014 Announced

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Last Wednesday, November 12th, 2014, the third annual Information is Beautiful Awards celebrated data visualization at its best. Hundreds of entries were trimmed to an elite set of outstandingly illuminating infographics, over which the judges deliberated long and hard. Now, with thanks to their generous sponsors Kantar, here are the winners.

Data Visualization

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Gold – Rappers, Sorted by Size of Vocabulary by Matthew Daniels

Silver – Weather Radials Poster by Timm Kekeritz

Bronze – The Depth of the Problem by The Washington Post

Special mention – The Analytical Tourism Map of Piedmont by Marco Bernardi, Federica Fragapane and Francesco Majno

 

Infographic

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Gold – Creative Routines by RJ Andrews

Silver – Game of Thrones Decoded by Heather Jones

Bronze – The Graphic Continuum by Jonathan Schwabish and Severino Ribecca

 

Interactive

The Refugee Project by Hyperakt and Ekene Ijeoma

Gold – The Refugee Project by Hyperakt and Ekene Ijeoma

Silver – How Americans Die by Bloomberg Visual Data

Joint Bronze – Commonwealth War Dead: First World War Visualised by James Offer

Joint Bronze – World Food Clock by Luke Twyman

 

Motion infographic

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Gold – NYC Taxis: A Day in the Life by Chris Whong

Silver – Beyond Bytes by Maral Pourkazemi

Bronze – Everything You Need to Know about Planet Earth by Kurzgesagt

Special mention – Energy by Adam Nieman

 

Website

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Gold – Selfiecity by Moritz Stefaner

Silver – OECD Regional Well-Being by Moritz Stefaner

Bronze – After Babylon by Sofia Girelli, Eleonora Grotto, Pietro Lodi, Daniele Lupatini and Emilio Patuzzo

 

Tool

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Gold – RAW by Density Design Research Lab

Silver – Kennedy by Brendan Dawes

Bronze – Figure it Out by Friedrich Riha

 

Student

Sam Slover, Wrap Genius

Sam Slover, Wrap Genius

 

Individual

Brendan Dawes, Kennedy

Brendan Dawes, Kennedy

 

Studio

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FFunction, Women in Science and HP What Matters

 

Corporate

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Schwandt Infographics, Biobased Economy

 

Community

The Rite of Spring by Stephen Malinowski and Jay Bacal

The Rite of Spring by Stephen Malinowski and Jay Bacal

 

Most Beautiful

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RAW by Density Design Research Lab

Tips & Tricks #11: The URL path is not visible in the report properties dialog box in MicroStrategy Web

The Issue

Each report and document has a URL path that could be used to directly execute the object when pasted in the browser address bar. The URL path can be found in the properties section when a user right-clicks on the object.

The expected view of that window is as follows:

The view observed by some users without the link feature:

The Cause

The required feature is not enabled in the MicroStrategy Web Admin page.

The Fix

  1. Navigate to the MicroStrategy Web Admin page.
  2. Select ‘Security’ on the left-hand side.
  3. Under ‘URL’, enable the feature – “Session information is included on the URL”.

 

Workaround 

If the session information setting should remain off for security reasons, use the Show Link feature as shown below.

 

Reference

MicroStrategy Knowledgebase Technical Note 39787, Updated July 22, 2013.

Forbes: Data Visualization Is The Future – Here’s Why

Readers:

Dorie ClarkI read this blog post from Dorie Clark back in March. I keep notes on interesting blogs and articles I come across and wanted to share this one with you regards the importance of data visualization.

Dorie Clark is a marketing strategist and professional speaker who teaches at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business. Learn more about her new book Reinventing You: Define Your Brand, Imagine Your Future (Harvard Business Review Press) and follow her on Twitter.

I hope you find this helpful in your data visualization endeavors.

Best regards,

Michael

Data Visualization Is The Future – Here’s Why

We’ve all heard that Big Data is the future. But according to Phil Simon’s new book The Visual Organization: Data Visualization, Big Data, and the Quest for Better Decisions, that may not be quite right. Big Data is a powerful discovery tool for companies seeking to glean new insights. But without the right framework for understanding it, much of that knowledge may go unrecognized. Oftentimes, it’s data visualization that allows Big Data to unleash its true impact.

The Visual Organization is fundamentally about how progressive organizations today are using a wide array of data visualization (dataviz) tools to ask better questions of their data – and make better business decisions,” says Simon, citing the example of companies such as Amazon, Apple , Facebook, Google, Twitter, and Netflix, among others.

Phil Simon
Data visualization allows Big Data to unleash its true impact, as author Phil Simon explains.

Two recent factors have conspired to make this the moment for data visualization. First, says Simon, is the rise of Big Data and the growing public awareness of its power. “Today more than ever, professionals are being asked to argue their cases and make their decisions based on data,” he says. “A new, data-oriented mind-set is permeating the business world.”

But that push outside IT circles means that many non-technical professionals must now produce and comprehend insights from Big Data. Visualization can help, and a raft of new tools makes that possible. “IBM, Cognos, SAS, and other enterprise BI (business intelligence) stalwarts are still around, but they are no longer the only game in town,” he says. “Today, an organization need not spend hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars to get going with dataviz. These new tools have become progressively more powerful and democratic over the last decade. Long gone are the days in which IT needed to generate reports for non-technical employees. They have made it easier than ever to for employees to quickly discover new things in increasingly large datasets. Examples include Visual.ly, Tableau, Vizify, D3.js, R, and myriad others.”

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Source: Dorie Clark, Data Visualization Is The Future – Here’s Why, Forbes, March 10, 2014, http://www.forbes.com/sites/dorieclark/2014/03/10/data-visualization-is-the-future-heres-why/.

Fast Company: Is Flat Design Already Passé?

Source: John Brownlee, Is Flat Design Already Passé?, Fast Company, Co.DESIGN, April 11, 2014, http://www.fastcodesign.com/3028944/is-flat-design-already-passe.

Skeuomorph CalendarBlog Note: A skeuomorph is a derivative object that retains ornamental design cues from structures that were necessary in the original. Examples include pottery embellished with imitation rivets reminiscent of similar pots made of metal and a software calendar that imitates the appearance of binding on a paper desk calendar (see image to the right).

Over the last few years, we’ve seen an upheaval in the way computer interfaces are designed. Skeuomorphism is out, and flat is in. But have we gone too far? Perhaps we’ve taken the skeuomorphic death hunts as far as they can go, and its high time we usher in a new era of post-flat digital design.

John Brownlee

John Brownlee

Ever since the original Macintosh redefined the way we interact with computers by creating a virtual desktop, computer interfaces have largely been skeuomorphic by mimicking the look of real-world objects. In the beginning, computer displays were limited in resolution and color, so the goal was to make computer interfaces look as realistic as possible. And since most computer users weren’t experienced yet, skeuomorphism became a valuable tool to help people understand digital interfaces.

But skeuomorphism didn’t make sense once photo-realistic computer displays became ubiquitous. Computers have no problem tricking us into thinking that we’re looking at something real so we don’t need to use tacky design tricks like fake stitching or Corinthian leather to fool us into thinking our displays are better than they are. In addition, most people have grown up in a world where digital interfaces are common. UI elements don’t have to look like real-world objects anymore for people to understand them.

This is why Jony Ive took over the design of Apple’s iOS and OS X operating systems and began a relentless purge of the numerous skeuomorphic design elements that his predecessor, skeuomaniac Scott Forstall, created. To quote Fast Company’s own John Pavlus, “skeuomorphism is a solution to a problem that iOS no longer has,” and that’s true of other operating systems and apps too. Google, Microsoft, Twitter, Facebook, Dropbox, even Samsung, they’re all embracing flat design, throwing out the textures and gradients that once defined their products, in favor of solid hues and typography-driven design.

This is, without a doubt, a good thing. Skeuomorphism led to some exceedingly one-dimensional designs, such as iOS 6’s execrable billiard-style Game Center design. But in an excellent post, Collective Ray designer Wells Riley argues that things are going too far.

Flat design is essentially as far away from skeuomorphism as you can get. Compare iOS 7’s bold colors, unadorned icons, transparent overlays, and typography-based design to its immediate precessor, iOS 6. Where once every app on iOS had fake reflections, quasi-realistic textures, drop shadows, and pseudo-3-D elements, iOS 7 uses pure colors, no gradients, no shadows, and embraces the 2-D nature of a modern smartphone display. But while flat design has made iOS 7 look remarkably consistent, it has also removed a lot of personality from the operating system. It’s like the Gropius house, when the old iOS 6 was a circus funhouse. Maybe it needs to get a little bit of that sense of madness back.

Here’s how Riley defines elements of a post-flat interface:

• Hierarchy defined using size and composition along with color.

• Affordant buttons, forms, and interactive elements.

• Skeuomorphs to represent 1:1 analogs to real-life objects (the curl of an e-book page, for example) in the name of user delight.

• Strong emphasis on content, not ornamentation.

• Beautiful, readable typography.

 

Riley’s argument is that flat design has allowed digital designers to brush the slate clean in terms of how they approach their work, but it has also hindered a sense of wonder and whimsy. Software should still strongly emphasizes content, color, and typography over ornamentation, but why is, say, the curl of a page when you’re reading an e-book such a crime, when it so clearly gives users delight?

“Without strict visual requirements associated with flat design, post-flat offers designers tons of variety to explore new aesthetics—informed by the best qualities of skeuomorphic and flat design.” Riley writes. “Dust off your drop shadows and gradients, and introduce them to your flat color buttons and icons. Do your absolute best work without feeling restricted to a single aesthetic. Bring variety, creativity, and delight back to your interfaces.”

Maybe Riley has a point. Why should mad ol’ Scott Forstall be allowed to ruin skeuomorphism for everyone? With the lightest of brush strokes, skeuomorphism can be used to bring back a sense of personality and joy to our apps. For those of us growing listless in the wake of countless nearly identical “flat” app designs, he makes a good point. It is time for the pendulum towards flat and away from skeuomorphism to swing back, if only a little bit.