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Introducing Adobe Brackets 1.0 and Extract for Brackets (Preview)

Readers:

We had a Technology Discovery Day the other day at work. I worked my way over to the folks from Adobe to try to get some questions answered. I have been an Adobe Flex and Flash user and wanted to know what my alternatives were going to be going forward with custom mobile report development for Apple products since they do not support Flash (actually, they really do, but don’t want us to know that).

I talked to one of the reps from Adobe and he told me to look at Adobe Brackets. I have downloaded and installed the Brackets editor and have been getting familiar with it.

Here is a brief overview of Adobe Brackets from their Creative Cloud Team. Once I become more proficient, I will blog more about it.

MicroStrategy, Tableau, Qlikview: Are you listening?

Best Regards,

Michael

brackets_logo_flat

What is Brackets?

Brackets is a modern, open source text editor that understands web design. It was built for web designers and front-end developers working with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Adobe not only created Brackets, but were also a key contributor to the project. When Adobe first started Brackets, they wanted to release early and often. They have done both. This will mark the 45th release of Brackets in 3 years; it’s a pace of innovation that our teams are able to maintain now that we’ve moved to Creative Cloud.

ExtractBrackets_2

Introducing Extract for Brackets (preview)

This release also includes a preview of Extract for Brackets, a new Creative Cloud service that lets you view and get information and assets out of a PSD right from your text editor. Extract for Brackets lets you pull things like colors, fonts, measurement, gradients, and more from a PSD in the form of contextual code hints in CSS and HTML files. You can also extract layers as images, use information from the PSD to define preprocessor variables, and easily get dimensions between objects. Adobe is really excited about how it will improve the process of moving from design to development and speed workflows.

ExtractBrackets_3

If you haven’t looked at Brackets in a while or are brand new to it, now is a great time to see the awesome stuff Adobe has been working on.

Brackets blends visual tools right into the editor so you get the right amount of help when you want it. In more recent releases, Adobe has added multiple cursors, split view, theme support, and many more fixes and enhancements.

Extract for Brackets (preview) can be downloaded as a standalone extension from the Brackets Extension Registry or included with Brackets 1.0 in a bundle that’s immediately available as a free download from brackets.io.

————————————————————

Sources:

Tips & Tricks #12: How to Troubleshoot Cross Joins in SQL Reports for the SQL Generation Engine 9.x

MicroStrategy Community Banner

Readers:

In my last blog post, I blogged about the new MicroStrategy Community. Jaime Perez, VP of Worldwide Customer Services, and his crew have come up with a better way for us to engage with MicroStrategy as well as his team.

Speaking of Jaime, last June, he posted this great tip on the MicroStrategy Knowledgebase site as a TechNote. I am reblogging it since it is one of the most frequent questions I get asked and I find it an extremely useful Tip & Trick. Also, this will give you an idea of the great stuff being posted in the MicroStrategy Community.

Best Regards,

Michael

MicroStrategy and Cross Joins

In some scenarios, one may encounter cross joins in the SQL View of a standard, SQL Report in MicroStrategy.  Cross joins appear when two tables do not have any common key attributes between them in which they can inner join.  As a result, the two tables essentially combine together to create one table that has all the data from both tables, but this results in poorer performance with a common effect of increased execution times.  Sometimes these execution times, and performance hits, can be very severe.  Therefore, it is important to understand some simple steps that can be performed to resolve a cross join, as well as some steps to understand why it may be appearing in the SQL View of the report.

One common occurrence of a cross join is when a report contains at least two unrelated attributes in the grid, and no metrics are present in order to relate the unrelated attributes via a fact table.  Such a occurrence can be resolved in a few ways:

  1. Create a relationship filter, set the output level as the unrelated attributes (or the entire report level), and then relate these by a Logical Table object
  2. Create a relationship filter, set the output level as the unrelated attributes (or the entire report level), and then relate these by a Fact object
  3. Add a metric to the report that uses a fact from a table in which both attributes can inner join to

This provides a pathway from the fact table to the lookup tables in which the unrelated attributes are sourced from.  The result is an inner join between the fact table and the lookup tables, which resolves the cross join between the two unrelated lookup tables.

Options 1 and 2 provide a means in which the report template can remain as only attributes, whereas Option 3 would have a metric on the report.  Option 3 may not be desired if a metric does not want to be placed on the report.  Keep in mind that other techniques can also be employed to have the metric on the report, but formatted to be hidden from display.

More common scenarios include cross joins between a fact table and a lookup table, and are typically surprising to a developer.  These situations can be a bit more tricky to troubleshoot and resolve, but here are a few techniques that can be employed to try to resolve the issue:

  1. In SQL View look at where the cross join appears, and between which tables the cross join appears
  2. Open up those tables in the Table Editor by navigating to the Schema Objects\Tables folder, and double-clicking the tables
  3. Select the Logical View Tab of both tables to see all the logical objects mapped to the table
  4. Take note of which attributes have a key icon beside them
  5. These key attributes denote attributes at the lowest level of their hierarchy presently mapped to the table and/or attributes that are in their own hierarchy (meaning they have no parents or children)
  6. The SQL Engine will join 2 tables on common key attributes only, so if none of the key attributes on either table exist on both tables, then a cross join should appear

This means that just because a Region attribute exists on Table_A and a Region attribute exists on Table_B does not necessarily mean that the SQL Engine will join on Region.  If Region has its child attribute on the table, then that attribute should be the key as it is the lowest level attribute of its particular hierarchy mapped to the table.  If Region exists on both tables, and is also a key attribute on both tables, then an inner join should take place on Region.

This essentially means that one can find a cross join, investigate the tables in which it appears, and verify if at least 1 common key attribute exists between the tables.  If not, then that should be the first path to investigate because a cross join is correct in that scenario.

Video

You can find a detailed video on how this issue is reproduced and resolved here: Tech Note 71019 . Steps to reproduce and resolve

Note

MicroStrategy Technical Support can assist with resolving cross joins in a specific report, however caution should be taken when resolving such issues.  In some scenarios, the cross join is resolved through modifications to the schema objects, which can have a ripple effect to all other reports in an environment.  For example, if a relationship is changed in the Region attribute to resolve a cross join in one report, this change will be reflected in all other reports that use Region, and potentially the hierarchy in which Region belongs.  As a result, the SQL View of one report will have the cross join resolved, but the SQL may have changed in other reports using Region or its related attributes.  This may or may not be desired.  MicroStrategy Technical Support may not be able to fully understand the impact of such a schema change to the data model, so before a change is made to the data model the consequences of such a change should be fully understood by the developer, and any changes made to the schema should be recorded.

References

[1] Jaime Perez, TN47356: How to troubleshoot cross joins in SQL Reports for the SQL Generation Engine 9.x, MicroStrategy Community, 06/24/2014, http://community.microstrategy.com/t5/Architect/TN47356-How-to-troubleshoot-cross-joins-in-SQL-Reports-for-the/ta-p/196989.

[2] MicroStrrategy Knowledgebase, Tech Note 71019 . Steps to reproduce and resolve,

12 JavaScript Libraries for Data Visualization

Readers:

This is from a blog post by Thomas Greco.

Thomas GrecoThomas is a web developer / graphic designer living in New York City. When Thomas isn’t striving towards front­end perfection, he enjoys hanging with friends, going to concerts, and exploring through the wilderness!

Thomas has provided twelve JavaScript frameworks that are extremely useful for data visualization. Thomas feels that a more heavy focus is being placed on JavaScript as a data visualization tool.

I tried the demos for these JavaScript frameworks and they are very impressive. I hope you enjoyed this information as much as I did.

Best regards,

Michael

Dygraphs.js

The Dygraphs.js library allows developers to create interactive charts using the X and Y axis to display powerful diagrams. The more data being parsed, the higher the functionality of the graph. That being said, Dygraphs was built for these visualizations to contain a multitude of views. For example, Dygraphs.js makes it capable to analyze separate portions of a data-set, such as specific months, in addition to the timeframe in its entirety. Also, the Dygraphs.js library is compatible across all major web browsers, and can responds to touch sensitivity, making it a thoroughougly solid choice as a data visualization framework.

D3.js

Eventually becoming the successor to Protovis.js, D3 is capable of creating stunning graphics via dynamically updating the DOM. An acronym for Data-Driven Document, D3.js makes use of chained methods when scripting visualizations, subsequently creating dynamic code that is also reusable. Due to its reliance on the DOM, D3 has been created in accordance with W3C web standards so that the library may render correctly across web browsers. Lastly, D3′s path generator function, defined as d3.svg.line(), gives developers the capability to produce a handful of SVGs by defining different paths, and their properties.

InfoVis

Commonly referred to as InfoVis, the JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit (JIT) also earned its stripes as a JavaScript library for data visualization. Equipped with WebGL support, InfoVis has been trusted by names like Mozilla and AlJazeera, showing its solidarity as a visualization tool. Along with the D3 framework, InfoVis also makes use of chained methods to manipulate the DOM, making it a reliable library for developers of any skill set.

The Google Visualization API

Hailing from the Google Developers Console (GDC), Google’s Visualization API can be called with barely any code. In addition to easy DOM modification, this Google API makes it easy for its user to easily define custom modifier functions that can then be placed into custom groups. Furthermore, this interface’s usability, matched with its support from the GDC’s open source network, place it among the top of the list of data visualization tools.

Springy.js

Springy.js is a JavaScript library that relies on an algorithm to create force-directed graphs, resulting in nodes reacting in a spring-like manner on the web page. Although Springy.js comes configured with a predefined algorithm, options such as spring stiffness and damping can easily be passed as parameters. Springy.js was developed by Dennis Hotson as a library for developers to build off of – a fact that he makes clear.

Polymaps.js

Polymaps.js makes use of SVGs to generate interactive web maps with cross browser compatibility in mind. At the heart of Polymaps lies vector tiles, which help ensure both optimal load speeds and optimal zoom functionality. Although it may come configured with components, Polymaps.js is easily customized, and is able to read data in the form of vector geometry, GeoJSON Files, and more. Check out the graph below of the U.S. created by the U.S. Census borough.

Dimple

This past January, the Dimple API was developed so that analysts at Align-Alytics could develop strong data visualizations without having to possess much development knowledge. That being said, Dimple makes it easy for anyone, analyst or not, to develop stunning, three dimensional graphics without any real JavaScript training. Moreover, dimplejs.org displays several demonstrations, which can be easily manipulated by one’s personal data to render a graph with the same configuration, but different values. So, if you, or anyone you know is trying to segway into the depths of JavaScript, then these examples are perfect for beginners to vist and poke around.

Sigma.js

For people looking to build highly advanced line graphs, Sigma.js provides an unbelievable amount of interactive settings inside its library, and also within its plug-ins. Hailing a motto that states “Dedicated to Graph Drawing”, those developing using Sigma.js cannot help but feel like they have chosen a reliable library to work with. Moreover, Sigma’s developers encourage people to re-configure this library and create plug-ins, which has resulted in a large open-source network. Having said all that, I was extremely pleased with various aspects of Sigma, and it is among my favorite libraries for creating graphical representations in JavaScript.

Raphael.js

The Raphael.js library was created with an emphasis on browser compatibility. The framework follows the SVG W3C Recommendation, which is a set of standards that ensure images are completely scalable and without pixelation. In addition to the use of SVGs, Raphael.js even reverts to the Vector Model Language (VML) if rendered in Internet Explorer browsers prior to IE9. Although VML is very rarely used today, the support for it does a great job of showing the attention to detail that the Raphael.js team placed on this project when developing the library.

gRaphaël

Although Raphael.js is a library used to for the creation of SVGs, it was not built with a total focus on the representation of large datasets. In turn, the gRaphaël JavaScript library was created. Weighing in at a mere 10KB, gRaphaël.js has proven to be a worthy extension to Raphael.js. Although it may have not been developed behind things like a force-driven algorithm, nor does it come pre-configured with any physics properties, gRaphaël is still a well respected library for reasons ranging from its cross-compatible SVG structure, to its ease of use. As long as it coincides with the task at hand, I believe that gRaphaël.js should always be looked at as a viable resource to complete a project.

Leaflet

Whether developing for a smartphone, tablet, or desktop, the Leaflet JavaScript library has ranked atop the list of interactive mapping libraries for several reasons. Lead by the founder of MapBox, Vladimir Agafonkin, the Leaflets team of developers worked to create a library “designed with simplicity, performance, and usability in mind.” Along with Polymaps, Leaflet shares the ability to render SVG pattens via vector tiles, however only Leaflet has been developed to support Retina display. Furthermore, Leaflet can interpret various forms of data such as GeoJSON, making it perfect for a number of tasks.

Ember Charts

For those who already use the juggernaut that is Ember.js, the developers at Addepar Open Source have created a few add-on libraries to extend the Ember experience: Ember Table, Ember Widgets, and Ember Charts. A child of Ember.js and D3.js, Ember Charts utilizes the properties of flat-design. Although limited, the library does have a handful of options that deal with properties such as color and size, making it fairly simple to create impressive visualizations. Nonetheless, Ember’s presence in the front end could really help Ember Chart’s popularity in the future.

Tips & Tricks #7: How to Enable or Disable Match Case Sensitivity for Prompts using MicroStrategy Web

Readers:

Believe it or not, this is a question I get asked a lot by clients. Based on their requirements or data, many clients do not want the Match Case Sensitivity check box preference enabled to begin with when they are prompted. Fortunately for us, the solution to this is fairly simple as I show below.

If you have a MicroStrategy question you would like me to answer or blog about, please e-mail it to me (include screenshots if it will help) to michael@dataarchaeology.net. I will do my best to answer your questions.

Best Regards,

Michael

Match Case Sensitivity Preference

When you run certain prompt types in MicroStrategy Web, the interface offers a search option followed by a Match Case Sensitivity check box.

This functionality allows users to search for specific elements within the prompt’s available answers. To allow even more flexibility, the check box allows the user to restrict the search results only to those that match the case entered. In the screenshot below, you can see the check box is enabled (checked) and case sensitivity will be matched.

Tip7-0

However, you can control whether this option is enabled or disabled by default for all prompts by setting the following preference in MicroStrategy Web.

This option is under Preferences, Project Defaults, Prompts.

Don’t forget to press the Apply button for the changes to take place.

Tip7-1a

Now, in the screenshot below, you can see the check box is disabled (unchecked) and case sensitivity will not be matched.

Tip7-2

 

Gartner Releases 2014 Magic Quadrant for BI and Analytics Platforms

Gartner Magic Quadrant BI 2014

Readers:

Gartner has just released its 2014 Magic Quadrant for Business Intelligence and Analytics Platforms.

I need a few days to soak this in and better comment on it. But, for now, I thought I would share the Magic Quadrant with you.

You can see the entire report by clicking here.

Best regards,

Michael

Gartner describes and defines the market as follows.

The BI and analytics platform market is in the middle of an accelerated transformation from BI systems used primarily for measurement and reporting to those that also support analysis, prediction, forecasting and optimization. Because of the growing importance of advanced analytics for descriptive, prescriptive and predictive modeling, forecasting, simulation and optimization (see “Extend Your Portfolio of Analytics Capabilities”) in the BI and information management applications and infrastructure that companies are building — often with different buyers driving purchasing and different vendors offering solutions — this year Gartner has also published a Magic Quadrant exclusively on predictive and prescriptive analytics platforms (see Note 1). Vendors offering both sets of capabilities are featured in both Magic Quadrants.

The BI platform market is forecast to have grown into a $14.1 billion market in 2013, largely through companies investing in IT-led consolidation projects to standardize on IT-centric BI platforms for large-scale systems-of-record reporting (see “Forecast: Enterprise Software Markets, Worldwide, 2010-2017, 3Q13 Update”). These have tended to be highly governed and centralized, where IT production reports were pushed out to inform a broad array of information consumers and analysts. While analytical capabilities were deployed, such as parameterized reports, online analytical processing (OLAP) and ad hoc query, they were never fully embraced by the majority of business users, managers and analysts, primarily because most considered these too difficult to use for many analytical use cases. As a result, and continuing a five-year trend, these installed platforms are routinely being complemented, and in 2013 were increasingly displaced, in new sales situations by new investments, and requirements were more skewed toward business-user-driven data discovery techniques to make analytics beyond traditional reporting more accessible and pervasive to a broader range of users and use cases.

Also in support of wider adoption, companies and independent software vendors are increasingly embedding both traditional reporting, dashboards and interactive analysis, in addition to more advanced and prescriptive analytics built from statistical functions and algorithms available within the BI platform into business processes or applications. The intent is to expand the use of analytics to a broad range of consumers and nontraditional BI users, increasingly on mobile devices. Moreover, companies are increasingly building analytics applications, leveraging new data types and new types of analysis, such as location intelligence and analytics on multistructured data stored in NoSQL data repositories.

Tips & Tricks #5: Designing MicroStrategy Documents for Exporting to Excel

Overview

The following best practices will help ensure that your document is displayed correctly when it is exported to Microsoft Excel. When you export to Excel, the resulting spreadsheet looks like a PDF of the document. For example, objects have the same position and size in Excel that they do in a PDF.

For steps to export a document to Excel, see the section Exporting a document in MicroStrategy Web later in this blog entry.

When designing a document that might be exported to Excel, do the following to ensure that the document is displayed correctly in Microsoft Excel:

  • Know how different object types are exported and displayed in Excel, as shown in the following table:

Tip5-1

  • Choose Excel-compatible colors for all objects, including panels, shapes, and Grid/Graphs. Use the set of 40 colors that appear in the Color dialog box in the Document Editor. Excel supports these 40 colors in addition to many more. Other colors are matched by Microsoft Excel as closely as possible. Avoid using gradient colors, since they are not exported to Excel.

Tip 5-2

1 Excel Fill Colors

Tip5-3

2 Excel Font Colors

  • Use graph styles that are supported by Microsoft Excel. For example, if you include a Gauge graph in the document, it is not displayed in Excel. If you include a Combination graph, the exported version in Excel may not be displayed exactly like the original graph in MicroStrategy Web.
  • Avoid overlapping objects. When exported, the document may not be displayed correctly. For example, an object in the background of the document may be displayed in the foreground of the Excel spreadsheet.
  • Provide extra space around objects because they may increase in size when the document is exported to Excel.
  • Use text field borders to create lines and rectangles. Standard MicroStrategy line and rectangle controls may not be displayed correctly in Excel. You can also use a panel stack to create a colored background; for instructions to create panel stacks, see the Dashboard Creation Guide.

Tip5-4

3 Excel Border (Line) Colors and Weights

Avoid inserting line breaks within text fields. Line breaks (inserted by typing CTRL+ENTER) are not rendered in Excel.

  • Do not enable word-wrapping in a column header on a Grid/Graph in MicroStrategy. If you do so, the headers are not displayed correctly in Excel or PDF. Enable word-wrapping in Excel after you export the document.

Tip5-5

4 Turning off Word Wrap in MicroStrategy

Tip5-6

5 Turning off Word Wrap in Excel

  • Use an absolute file path to define the location of an image used in a document. Do not use a relative file path. Images in documents specified with paths relative to MicroStrategy Web and Intelligence Server are not displayed when exported to Excel.

Exporting a document in MicroStrategy Web

Exporting a document allows you view and interact with the document results outside of MicroStrategy Web. For example, you can view results in a PDF file within Adobe Reader, manipulate exported data in an Excel spreadsheet, or create an interactive Flash dashboard for off-line use.

You can export a document to the following formats:

  • PDF file: Export the document to a PDF file in a reader, such as Adobe Reader. You can view the PDF on any device with a PDF reader, such as another computer, a Linux machine, a Nook, or a Kindle.
  • Excel spreadsheet (.xls): Export the document to a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet for further manipulation and use. See the Document Creation Guide for tips to create a document that will display correctly when it is exported to Excel.
  • HTML file: Export the document to an html file in a separate window.
  • Flash file: Export the document to a fully interactive, stand-alone Flash file. All the Flash files in a project are exported in one of the following formats:
  • MHT format, which can be opened in Internet Explorer, and in Firefox with a third-party plug-in

The document designer determines the Flash file format.

You are prompted for the following when you export a document, unless the document designer has specified the default exporting options for the document:

  • If your document is grouped, you can choose to export the entire document or only the selected group element. Page-by allows you to view the document by a selected group element.
  • If your document contains multiple layouts, you can choose to export the entire document or only the layout currently being viewed by the user.
  • You can export a document from within the document, or directly from a folder. The following procedures describe both tasks. You can also export a single Grid/Graph to a PDF file or an Excel spreadsheet.

To export an open document

  1. In MicroStrategy Web, click the name of the document to execute it.
  2. From the Home menu, select Export, then select the file format in which to export the document. The options are:
    • Excel
    • HTML
    • PDF
    • Flash

       If an export format is not available on the toolbar, that export format has not been made available for this document.

3. Depending on the file type, you may be prompted to open or save the exported file. You can choose to either:

  • Open the file, by clicking Open. A copy of the document opens in a browser.
  • Save the file, by clicking Save. Name and save the file. Do not change the file type.

To export a document directly from a folder

  1. In MicroStrategy Web, right-click the document and select Run as.
  2. If the document contains prompts, answer them and click Export.
  3. If DHTML is disabled, click the Export icon or PDF icon in the Actions column.

*        If an export format is not available on the toolbar, that export format has not been made available for this document.

4. If DHTML is enabled, select the format to export to:

    • To export to a PDF, select Export to PDF.
    • To export to Microsoft Excel, select Export to Excel.
    • To export to HTML, select Export to HTML.
    • To export to Flash, select Export to Flash.

5. Depending on the file type, you may be prompted to open or save the exported file. You can choose to either:

    • Open the file, by clicking Open. A copy of the document opens in a browser.
    • Save the file, by clicking Save. Name and save the file. Do not change the file type.

Exporting a Grid/Graph from a document

You can export a single Grid/Graph displayed in a document to either a PDF file or an Excel spreadsheet. This provides additional flexibility to share and print your data, so that you do not have to export the entire document.

The document must be displayed in Express or Flash Mode. In Express Mode, the title bar of the Grid/Graph must be displayed. The following procedures describe both tasks.

*         A widget is exported as a Grid/Graph.

To export a Grid/Graph from Express Mode

  1. In MicroStrategy Web, open the document in Express Mode.
  2. Click the icon on the title bar of the Grid/Graph and point to either Export to PDF or Export to Excel.
  3. If you choose PDF, the PDF file opens in another browser window.
  4. If you choose Excel, you are prompted to open or save the exported file. You can choose to either:
  5. Open the file, by clicking Open. A copy of the document opens in another browser window.
  6. Save the file, by clicking Save. Name and save the file. Do not change the file type.
  7. In MicroStrategy Web, open the document in Flash Mode.
  8. Hover your cursor over the Grid/Graph. Icons for exporting to Excel and to PDF are displayed.
  9. Do one of the following:

To export a Grid/Graph from Flash Mode

  • To export the Grid/Graph to Excel, click the Export to Excel icon. You are prompted to open or save the exported file. You can choose to either:
  • Open the file, by clicking Open. A copy of the document opens in another browser window.
  • Save the file, by clicking Save. Name and save the file. Do not change the file type.
  • To export the Grid/Graph to PDF, click the Export to PDF icon. The PDF file opens in another browser window.

Tips & Tricks #2: In MicroStrategy Web, Report Execution Fails with Error ‘Results for this message cannot be retrieved from MicroStrategy Intelligence Server. This might be because the execution has failed. Please contact your administrator.’

I had this error the other day. Fortunately, I had just been reading about working set governor settings the other night to prepare for the CPA and MCE exams.

First, let’s discuss the issue.

Issue/Problem

In MicroStrategy Web, when I executed a report, I received the following error message (also, see screenshot below).

(Results for this message cannot be retrieved from MicroStrategy Intelligence Server. This might be because the execution has failed. Please contact your administrator.)

Results cannot be retrieved error message

Basically, what happened was my report request could not be processed. Looking through the MicroStrategy KnowledgeBase, it basically tells you to try to run the report again. If it still throws this error, contact your Administrator.

If you look at the Web Log on the Web Server, you will see an error similar to the following:

<record reset=`true`>
 <package>com.microstrategy.webapi</package>
 <level>SEVERE</level>
 <miliseconds>1157577081154</miliseconds>
 <timestamp>09/06/2006 14:11:21:154</timestamp>
 <thread>154</thread>
 <class>CDSSXMLReportServer</class>
 <method>GetExecutionResultsEx</method>
 <message>(Results for this message cannot be retrieved from 
MicroStrategy Intelligence Server. This might be because the
execution has failed. Please contact your administrator.) 
(com.microstrategy.webapi.MSTRWebAPIException)</message>
 <exception>com.microstrategy.webapi.MSTRWebAPIException: 
(Results for this message cannot be retrieved from 
MicroStrategy Intelligence Server. This might be because
the execution has failed. Please contact your 
administrator.)
 at com.microstrategy.webapi.
CDSSXMLReportServer.GetExecutionResultsCommon(Unknown Source)
 at com.microstrategy.webapi.
CDSSXMLReportServer.GetExecutionResultsEx(Unknown Source)
 at com.microstrategy.web.objects.
WebReportInstanceImpl.
getExecutionResults(Unknown Source)
 at com.microstrategy.web.objects.
WebReportInstanceImpl.pollForResults(Unknown Source)
 at com.microstrategy.web.objects.
WebReportInstanceImpl.populateUserReportCache(Unknown Source)
 at com.microstrategy.web.objects.
WebReportInstanceImpl.pollStatus(Unknown Source)
 at com.microstrategy.web.beans.
ReportInstanceProxy.pollStatus(Unknown Source)
 at com.microstrategy.web.beans.
ReportBeanImpl.localCollectData(Unknown Source)
 at com.microstrategy.web.beans.
ReportBeanImpl.doCollectData(Unknown Source)
 at com.microstrategy.web.beans.
AbstractWebBean.collectData(Unknown Source)
 at com.microstrategy.web.app.beans.
AbstractAppComponent.collectData(Unknown Source)
 at com.microstrategy.web.app.beans.
ReportFrameBeanImpl.collectData(Unknown Source)
 at com.microstrategy.web.app.beans.
AbstractAppComponent.collectData(Unknown Source)
 at com.microstrategy.web.app.beans.
PageComponentImpl.collectData(Unknown Source)
 at com.microstrategy.web.app.
MSTRWebController.processRequest(Unknown Source)
 </exception>
 <userName>Administrator</userName>
 <clientID>172.19.19.2</clientID>
 </record>

The DSSErrors.log file on the MicroStrategy Intelligence Server contains the following errors:

[Kernel][Error] MsiWorkingSet::PersistMsg(): 
failed to attach RI to msg, error 0x80003F79
 [Kernel][Error] CDSSServerMessage::put_OriginalRI: 
WSResultPool->AddRI for msg xxxx return error 0x80003F79
 [Kernel][Error] CDSSServerMessage::put_OriginalRI: 
WSResultPool->AddRI for msg xxxx return error 0x80003F79
 [Kernel][Error] CDSSServerMessage::GetReportInstance():
get_OriginalRI() return error 0x1

Now what?

Solution

The size of the report that was to be executed has 40MB report cache size while the ‘Maximum RAM for Working Set cache size’ is set as 102,400KB, as shown in the image below:

Governing Rules - Default - Working Set

The MicroStrategy Intelligence Server was unable to swap out the report instances of 40MB in the Working Set.  To resolve this issue, I needed to increase the size of Maximum RAM for Working Set cache to a higher value, for example 512,000KB.

What is the ‘Working Set’ Governor Setting?

When a user runs a report from MicroStrategy Web or Web Universal, the results from the report are added to what is called the working set for that user’s session and stored in memory on the Intelligence Server. The working set is a collection of messages that reference in-memory report instances. A message is added to the working set when a user executes a report or retrieves a message from his or her Inbox.

The purpose of the working set is to:

  1. Allow the efficient use of the web browser’s Back button.
  2. Improve web performance for manipulations.
  3. Allow users to manually add messages to the History List.

This setting is accessible via the MicroStrategy Intelligence Server Configuration as shown below:

Governing Rules - Default - Working Set

Working Set Governors

The ‘Working Set file directory’ is the location in the filesystem where the Report Instances may be persisted on disk. A report instance will be persisted on disk in binary format if its size exceeds the limit set by the ‘Maximum RAM for Working Set cache’ governor or none of the report instances in memory can be swapped to make room for the new report instance. The persisted report instance will be persisted as the <filename(GUID)>.po and may be reused if the report is invoked again.

The ‘Maximum RAM for Working Set cache’ is the governor that modulates the size of the WorkingSet Result Pool. The Maximum value is: 2147483647 MB, the Minimum value depends on version and is 200 MB in 9.3.1, and the Default value is: 200 MB. Note that if the value specified is greater then the machines memory it uses the default of 200 MB. The default value is usually sufficient, but if memory issues arise, as noted above, the setting can be increased. Increasing this setting means that the MicroStrategy Intelligence Server may be operating with a higher average memory footprint during its lifecycle, so proper tuning may be needed if memory usage becomes an issue.

Important Notes

  • There is no Working Set (WS) for a session created by the MicroStrategy Desktop client.
  • This is a MicroStrategy Intelligence Server configuration level setting, so it applies to all the projects and all the users and is not specific to a project. If these settings are changed, MicroStrategy Intelligence Server may need to be restarted.
  • The MicroStrategy Working Set is not the same as the Microsoft Windows Operating System Working Set.